The Best WordPress Blogs to Follow in 2018

The Best WordPress Blogs to Follow in 2018

1. Smashing Magazine

Best WordPress Blogs

One of the most consistent and high-quality publications around, Smashing Magazine works as kind of the gold standard for WordPress blogs. Or technology blogs. Or really, blogs in general. Long-form content that dives deep into each subject they tackle is a mainstay, and even when they have sponsored posts, the content is held to the same standards as their day-to-day work and covers useful topics that just happen to pertain to the sponsor’s niche. Whether you’re a WordPress designer, developer, user, or some combination of all of those, you need to read Smashing Magazine. Stat.

 

2. The Pagely Blog

Best WordPress Blogs

You know who understands WordPress? Managed WordPress hosts. That’s just what Pagely is. But their blog isn’t self-promotion at all — it’s a valued resource covering business skills for professionals using WP to make their livings, designers, and more. Their marketing articles touch on topics that many of the best WordPress blogs don’t, so they hit on pressure points you may not even know you need to be pressed. Even their posts on managed WP hosting aren’t tied specifically to them and can be applied to multiple other hosts. All in all, Pagely’s blog is worth a read.

 

3. CodeinWP

Best WordPress Blogs

CodeinWP is, as they put it, a hub for WordPressers. Anyone involved in the pressing of words in any way can find something here. The art of blogging? Check. Business acumen and monetization? Yep. Even productivity tips that can make your WordPressing more…well…productive. They also offer neat downloadables every so often (productivity planners and so on), so they really try to be helpful for their readers. They aren’t just in it for the clicks.

 

4. Cats Who Code

Best WordPress Blogs

While the title absolutely can mean cats in the general folks or people way, this site was named after actual kitties. That’s a major point in its favor. That said, they also provide fantastic resources to WPers, and not only in the WordPress sphere. They cover ideas in general web development, too, as well as design trends. All of the topics, generally, can be applied to WordPress. I don’t think a week goes by that I don’t click into a CatsWhoCode article at least once.

5. Sucuri

Best WordPress Blogs

Not only are they one of the most trusted security plugins in the WordPress world, they also have one of the best WordPress blogs out there, too. When something blows up (not literally of course, but then again you never know with hackers) regarding WordPress, Sucuri will have a blog about it. You should check in occasionally to make sure you’re up to date on the latest threats (and their fixes) to your workspace and livelihood.

 

6.  Wordfence

Best WordPress Blogs

Take everything I said above, but replace Sucuri with Wordfence. (That’s a joke.) You can never be too careful when it comes to website security, and having two go-to publications to stay informed is better than having one.

 

7. WPLift

Best WordPress Blogs

Designed to be accessible, WPLift has a little bit of everything for the WordPress user. If you need to know about plugins, they probably have a write-up. If you want to see about certain themes, again, it’s probably there. They cover security and general tips and even put together guides so that you can be the best WordPresser around. Some of the most lifehack-style WP uses I know came from something I saw on WPLift at one point or another.

8. ManageWP.org

Best WordPress Blogs

Not exactly a blog, ManageWP.org (remember, it’s the .org extension, not .net or .com) is an aggregator of the best WordPress articles that have been published recently. Community submitted and voted on, the best articles tend to make their way to the top across all sorts of different categories. ManageWP is a great way to find some of the best WordPress blogs that you’ve never heard of. They may not be the millions-of-hits-per-day blogs all the time, but if you see it here, it’s generally going to have amazing information.

 

9. Torque

Best WordPress Blogs

Published by the top-end managed host, WP Engine, Torque pretty much lives up to its slogan: all the word that’s fit to press. If it’s worth talking about, you can bet that Torque has either written about it — or will in the near future. Daily posts from some of the WordPress communities top names make this one a guaranteed bookmark in your browser. Or entry in Feedly or whatever you use.

 

10. WP Tavern

Best WordPress Blogs

Free WordPress news. Free podcasts and free commentary. WP Tavern is one of the top news sources for WordPress because they are fast and accurate with what they report. In general, their community is strong and opinionated, and there can be some fantastic discussions in the comments sections. If you want to keep your finger on the beating pulse of our industry, WP Tavern is where to go.

 

11. The Layout by Flywheel

Best WordPress Blogs

If you’ve noticed a trend of managed WordPress hosts having great blogs, it’s because they generally do. Not only is it a great way to give back to their community, but it also helps attract people to their products. Flywheel is managed WP hosting aimed at designers, so their blog, The Layout, targets that same demo. Many of their articles are design best practices, tips to enhance the look and function of your WordPress site, and so on. But they also publish general WordPress tips, too, and a lot are on the technical side but broken down so that non-techies and right-brained people can make heads or tails of them.

 

12. The Yoast SEO Blog

Best WordPress Blogs

Yoast is arguably the King of the kingdom of WordPress SEO. If Google (or other search engines) does it, Yoast is on top of it, too. And their blog then explains it all to you in understandable language with videos and tutorials and infographics. With various series being published at different times, you might see an advice column one day, a use case the next, and then an explanation of why Yoast works the way it does the day after that. There’s a running joke on my weekly livestream that I can’t go a week without talking about Yoast and their blog, and there’s a good reason for that. It’s just too good not to share. So here’s me talking about Yoast’s blog again, sharing it with you, too.

 

13. WooCommerce

Best WordPress Blogs

If you sell things using WordPress, you likely use WooCommerce. If that’s the case, then you should subscribe to the WooCommerce official blog. Not only will you get development updates and know what’s coming so you can prepare your store, they also publish lots of best practices and business tips that have been tested and tend to work really well with the software.

 

14. WPBeginner

Best WordPress Blogs

Pretty much the place for WordPress how-tos these days. If you want to know how to do it in a simple, easy-to-understand, step-by-step way, WPBeginner probably has an article on it. Depending on the problem, their recommended solution may be a plugin to get the job done, while others may be a dive into your PHP files. Either way, when you have an issue, WPBeginner is a great place to see if there’s a solution. And if you can’t find it there…well, you may have just broken the internet.

15. WP Mayor

Best WordPress Blogs

If you can’t trust a blog that has a mascot with a monocle, who can you trust? WP Mayor is one of the best WordPress blogs because it has a little bit of everything for WordPress users. From beginners to advanced users, the team here has something for you. You may find out about a new plugin that makes your life easier or get a tip that increases your ecommerce revenue three-fold. Additionally, they keep a list of WordPress job boards for you, so if you’re looking for a side gig or even a full-time career, you should consider tossing your vote to WP Mayor.

 

16. WPMU DEV

Best WordPress Blogs

You may know WPMUDEV for their great set of premium WP plugins, but did you know they also publish one of the best WordPress blogs, too? Problem-solving is kind of their thing, and if it can happen to WordPress, they probably have a solution for it. And not just a hackey, good-enough solution. But a down-in-the-trenches, in-depth, you’re-never-going-to-worry-about-this-again kind of solution. Their writers will walk you through the steps you need for whatever the task is, and when you’re finished, you can’t not have learned something.

 

17. WPShout!

Best WordPress Blogs

While there are a ton of blogs out there focusing on the everyman WordPresser, WPShout is one of the best WordPress blogs aimed at developers. As you can see in the screenshot, they have quick guides for different topics, free courses you can run through, and they are always posting up new articles with goodies that will keep you clicking. Some of the best posts on WPShout are small commentary blogs that provoke thought and enable discussion, then link out to the article that brought up the idea in the first place. This is a great place to discover so much new stuff that you just have to check it out.

 

18. Ma.tt

Best WordPress Blogs

In 2003, Matt Mullenweg created WordPress. This is his blog.

19. Kinsta

Best WordPress Blogs

Another managed WordPress host putting out amazing content, Kinsta publishes one of the best WordPress blogs. It contains tips on PHP, back-end development, front-end development and design, plugin awareness, marketing, and even ecommerce. Some of the most intriguing content they do, though, is called Kinsta Kingpin, a series of interviews with WordPress professionals like you. While their normal content is superb, there’s something about these interviews that always makes me excited when I see another one posted. I think you’ll feel the same way.

 

20. Post Status

Best WordPress Blogs

Not so much a typical blog as a podcast with really good show notes, Post Status is one of those sites that grabs you and won’t let you go. Run by WP pro Brian Krogsgard, PS has become so much more than just a show or a site. Brian has put together a great community with PS, and he has been publishing and working in WordPress long enough that he has insight into the CMS that many of us only dream of having. He also covers topics that other sites tend to back away from, such as WordPress and Blockchain. Definitely worth a look (and a listen, too).

 

21. Make.WordPress

Best WordPress Blogs

I hesitated to include this one because it is definitely not the typical WordPress blog. But when I was thinking about the best WordPress blogs around, I realized that I check Make WordPress just as often as I do any others out there. You see, make.wordpress.org is the blog where you see what’s going on with WordPress as it happens. You get Gutenberg updates (in their What’s New in Gutenberg? series), team meeting minutes so you can see what was talked about during the latest design team or community building meeting, and that sort of thing. It’s not really a how-to kind of blog, but if you have even a passing interest in the goings-on behind the curtain, Make WordPress Core is going to impress you

 

 

Step-By-Step Guide: How to Start a Podcast

Step-By-Step Guide: How to Start a Podcast

A podcast is a mix of traditional radio format and 2.0 recording technology, all of which is animated by strong values from the Internet and the free-culture movement. Not only are they great alternatives to video if you’re not looking to become a YouTube star, but they are also a great way to engage with your audience. The idea of starting a podcast, a (mostly) audio-only online broadcast, may seem like a novel idea but that might not be the case. While it was in 2004 that the Internet (or the world?) saw the release of the first podcast, since then, they’ve seen a bit of a resurgence. Today, they are a great alternative to a blog if you’d rather vocalize your opinion, well, vocally instead of attempting to become the next Hemingway in a series of blog entries. While they take a bit more work than writing a post, they’re easier for the audience to digest, as they can passively engage by listening to a podcast just about anywhere.

Before you press the record button and publish your podcast to iTunes or your own website, there are a few things to take into account. Check out our step-by-step guide on how to start a podcast:

01. Define your goals

Before you jump into your (makeshift) recording studio, you should be 100% aware of what you’re getting yourself into. The first thing you need to do? Define the goal behind your podcast and go from there. This can be as simple as “I want to entertain” or “I want to inform”. It doesn’t matter as long as you’re passionate about the topic. Take the plunge and do it. Once your ultimate aim is established, you can always go back to it when questioning something along the way: “Does this action help build towards my goal?”

This is also the time to make important strategic decisions, including the primary topics you’ll be covering on your podcast so that your audience knows roughly what to expect when tuning in, as well as the frequency, schedule, and structure of your episodes. If you have a partner or co-host for your podcast, define your roles early as to what will be expected from each of you. For example, one of you is in charge of editing the audio for the podcast and posting it, and the other is responsible for any and all graphic work needed for the episodes. And both of you pitch in to the management of your social media accounts. The earlier you set these goals, the better.

02. Accept hard truths

Creating your own podcast is going to be a lot of fun, especially if you have a passion for the subject you’re covering. That said, you will need to face certain facts that are unavoidable. These hard truths are just something you’ll need to live with in order to move forward, but should in no way discourage you. Here are a couple of examples of what to expect:

  • Sorry, but there’s more than likely multiple podcasts like yours and you will likely be covering the exact same thing in many cases in certain episodes. Still, the podcast world doesn’t have your personal opinion and/or spin on it, so be sure to give it your best!
  • Do it for fun, not for fame. You will end up being disappointed if you’re constantly looking to get a “big break” from one of your episodes. As long as you continue to love creating your podcast, you’ve already won.
  • It will become a job of it’s own and you won’t want to do it sometimes, but you’ll have to. It’s like going to the gym: You don’t have to, but you know you should.

03. Get equipped

Just like most ventures, you more than likely don’t have everything you need to start your own podcast, and even if you think you do, you probably don’t. Yes, it’s true that all you technically need is something to talk about and a recording device, but if you want to take your podcast seriously you’re going to need to invest in some basic equipment. Namely, a microphone and a way to record, mix and edit audio.

Check check, one two: The type of microphone you purchase will largely depend on how you actually capture your audio but USB microphones are abundant in both availability and price ranges. Note: Go slightly above your budget when buying a microphone. Increasing your allocation by $50 or even $25 can get you a surprisingly nicer microphone, especially if it’s your first one.

Recording: Once you’ve settled on a microphone, you will, as mentioned above, need to figure out how you will be recording your audio. There are various ways to achieve this, but one of the easiest is to record directly to your computer using recording software. There are many free options available and most computers ship with (super basic) audio recording programs.

Editing time: After you’ve recorded your audio tracks, you’ll need to find software to edit it to make it sound good. This includes adding multiple tracks together if you have more than one person talking, taking out pauses, silence, adding sound effects and adding background music. There are plenty of softwares you can choose from, but if you’re looking for a robust and free editing software to get you where you need to go, give Audacity a try. When it comes to adding music and sound effects, don’t think you can just throw whatever you want into the tracks. Well, actually, you can, but don’t be surprised if you get hit with a copyright infringement claim. Like stock images, you want to make sure that you either have the appropriate license to use the audio or you’re using royalty free tracks. One of the best resources to find free music is YouTube. Its Sound Library hosts a ton of music for its creators to add to their videos, but it’s also royalty free music, so it can be used anywhere. In addition to this, there are several artists that post their own music to be used for free as long as you credit their work.

Find a podcast host: After you’ve recorded and edited your podcast, you’ll need to upload it somewhere and yes, after a handful of episodes, you’ll probably need to pay. There’s no short supply of options to choose from, but do your research before you settle on one.

Get equipped

04. Stick to your schedule – and plan for your laziness

This sounds like an easy one, but it can be hard. Even if your podcast is simply a hobby, there will still be times you don’t want to do it. A last minute invite to a friend’s pool or to check out that new museum exhibit will pop up at the exact time you were planning to record your next episode. Don’t worry, though. There are ways around it, but you’ll need to plan ahead:

  • Let’s say you release your podcast every Tuesday morning, try not to record on Monday night unless you like that type of stress impressed upon you. Allowing yourself some breathing room between recording and editing can give you a different perspective on how it went and that “thing” you wanted to cut out may be worth keeping after all. Like an artist struggling with a painting, sometimes you need to come back with “fresh ears.”
  • When recording, you want to try to keep your episodes in the same time range. The sweet spot is usually 40 minutes to an hour. No matter how long you decide to make your episodes, keeping them the time length can helps build expectations for your listeners, so don’t have a one hour episode one week and follow it up with a 20 minute episode the following week.
  • In order to stay on track, it’s a good idea to have an outline of what you will be discussing on the episode you’re recording. This is essential to stay on topic and away from tangents. However, we’d advise against fully scripting each episode. No one wants to hear you read to them, unless that indeed is the subject of your podcast.
  • It may take a while, but there will come a time where you “literally just can’t even” with your podcast because you’re too lazy. That’s okay! But have a plan for days like this by pre-recording evergreen episodes. While organizing a second recording session sounds like a pain, especially if you have co-hosts, it’s worth the extra effort. I promise you, you will thank yourself later.

05. Push your podcast on social networks like crazy

You may not have realized it, but you may spend more time on social media than recording your podcast, and for good reason. If you have a weekly podcast, you have one day a week that your listeners will dedicate their attention to you because it’s technically all you’re allowing. By sharing your own original content and relevant content from others on your social channels, you can stay in the game all of the other days that you don’t have a new episode to launch. Obviously, social media is a great platform to push your brand but also to find your audience and interact with fans. Do not skimp on this part. This is where you’ll be when you’re not recording, editing, or uploading your latest episode.

Push your podcast on social networks

06. Submit your podcast everywhere

When you first start setting up your podcast online with your host, you will receive a podcast feed URL. In order to submit your podcast to different directories like iTunes, Google Play or SoundCloud, for the most part, you’ll just need to fill out a form with your podcast name, website, and feed URL. Some submissions have a little extra work, so if you’re stuck, simply Google “How to submit podcast to X” and you’ll more than likely find your answer you’re looking for. Even if you’ve never heard of the podcast directory or don’t think it’s worth your time, think again. You’re looking for exposure with your podcast, so cast a wide net.

07. Showcase your podcast with a stunning website

While it’s definitely a good feeling to be able to search iTunes and have your very own podcast pop up, nothing really beats a dedicated website showing off what your podcast and the people behind it are all about. Not only can you link your podcast to any and all of the places people can listen, but so much more. Your website is your own and you won’t be bound by the styling of of iTunes or Google Play or wherever it can be found. Your website is also where you can share a little bit about yourself and the other hosts, just in case your fans want to know more about you or your team. It also provides a seamless way for potential business opportunities to get in touch with you by creating a designated contact page. Something you won’t find on your podcast directory listing. Think of your website as an extension of your brand. A place to display your logo and all of your other branding elements.

36 Free Places to Promote Your Website Online

36 Free Places to Promote Your Website Online

Promoting your website to reach wider audiences is a multi-tiered process. One of the first steps is to find valuable websites and online platforms that allow you to highlight your site’s URL in one way or another. To save you the leg work, we compiled a list of 36 great places for promoting online content. These links will help you establish your online presence one by one. Some work with a simple URL submission while others require a more strategic approach, but they all share one thing – they are free of charge.

What have you got to lose? Start now!

Online Directories for Businesses

Ranging from the most high-profile platforms to local directories, these websites cover a range of audiences. The flow is pretty much the same – you submit your website’s URL, as well as additional information about your business or organization. These sites, in turn, incorporate your info to their data banks, ensuring that your link is there when users are searching your content categories. In addition to direct display of your content, adding your links to these directories improves your site’s Search Engine Optimization, gradually improving your website’s ranking on search results.

Social Media and User-Generated Content

Social media has plenty to offer website owners. You’ve all heard of Facebook, of course, but are you using it correctly to promote your site? Have you considered the advantages of Pinterest, for instance? What about user-generated content like guides and tutorials on sites like WikiHow? The links below can all prove extremely useful for promoting your website. All you need to do is explore the ways in which they do.

Social Bookmarking and Curating

While these websites also operate on the basis of link-submission, the emphasis here is on content. You could submit a link to the main page as well as to individual pages, products, posts, images etc. These platforms then circulate your content to their audience base and drive traffic into your site, while also helping to boost your SEO by connecting your links to textual descriptive content.

Browser fingerprinting: What it is and whether you should worry about it

Browser fingerprinting: What it is and whether you should worry about it

It seems as though user safety and security has been a white hot subject for aeons. It’s certainly always been a popular topic online, and the latest buzzword to learn is “browser fingerprinting.”

A browser fingerprint works much like a physical one. In short, it enables savvy analytics app users to identify individuals simply by studying the information their browsers leave behind when navigating your website.

This post will look at browser fingerprinting in more detail, and discuss when it’s useful and if there are drawbacks. We’ll also talk about how recent data processing laws impact whether you should use it or not. Let’s get started!

What is browser fingerprinting?

Of course, we’re all identifiable from our fingerprint — a unique pattern in the skin on our fingers. Though, you’ll usually only be identified in this way when a crime has been committed, and the police need to match prints left at the scene with a name.

However, this concept of fingerprinting can also be applied to other areas. Because a fingerprint is essentially a unique identifier distinct from your most recognizable elements (i.e. your facial features), the term can also be used to describe the trail of information you leave online.

For example, consider browsing to a website. Unless you’re using a video chat service, there will be no visual elements linking you to that site. However, there are plenty of unique elements that make up your virtual presence, and all it takes is a sophisticated tracker to piece them together.

Usually, these elements fall into two camps:

  • HTTP headers
  • JavaScript elements

The former is pretty simple, as they’re part of practically every HTTP request. However, the latter can provide plenty of specific data relating to your browsing patterns. This includes aspects such as your time zone and date, the browser you’re using and the platform it runs on, the system fonts you use, and the browser’s installed plugins.

Individually, these elements might tell you very little. However, when combined, they can make up a fully unique profile of an individual user, known as a device or browser fingerprint.

How is browser fingerprinting used?

In a nutshell, fingerprinting is primarily used for long-term profit-making opportunities — by which we mean ads. Companies that implement this tactic are looking to ascertain who you are, how you browse the web, what you’re interested in, and what you purchase.

By curating user fingerprints, they end up with profiles that can be used to tailor content and ads to each person’s specific tastes. This obviously increases the likelihood that those users will end up spending money.
Browser fingerprinting can also be used in the place of cookies, and is arguably a better option for ad servers. In fact, fingerprinting can effectively reassemble a tracking cookie after it’s been deleted. What’s more, third-parties can track you across the web based on the nature of the data collected.

Of course, for the end user, this sounds like a scary prospect. However, for a business, this presents a potential golden opportunity to earn money.

Is browser fingerprinting a tactic you should use?

As the saying goes: every cloud has a silver lining. However, when it comes to browser fingerprinting, this aphorism is inverted. In other words, the upsides of the tactic are soured by the downsides.

There’s no doubt that browser fingerprinting and its variants are the ultimate in customer profiling tactics. However, it’s slowly becoming a technique that many companies (including Apple) want to see stopped.

End users are also pushing back against browser fingerprinting.

Tactics to strip away any tell-tale information from your browsing history have become popular, leading to so-called “incognito” or private tabs and windows, which includes the slow-and-steady rise of search engines that enable you to search anonymously, such as DuckDuckGo, and sites such as Am I Unique? and Panopticlick, and much more.

Overall, when it comes to whether you should use this tactic, it doesn’t really matter that it’s a useful way to profile your visitors. End users are concerned, which should be enough to stop you in your tracks. Plus, now that some big-name businesses are getting involved by hard-coding ways to stop the practice, there’s little sense in funneling resources away from more traditional approaches.

How does the GDPR impact the use of browser fingerprinting?

You might not be surprised to learn that the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has an effect on the use of browser fingerprinting. In fact, we may see the tactic evolve, given that websites now need to be transparent regarding how they handle personal data.

The data you collect through browser fingerprinting methods is classed as personal information, and as such has to be treated like any other data passing through your site.

Rather than seeing a specific mention of browser fingerprinting within the GDPR, therefore, you’ll find the various elements referred to throughout the entire regulation. When handled correctly, you can stay on the right side of the law, but you’re still likely to get pushback from your user base.

Use browser fingerprinting wisely

We’ll admit that these are tricky times when it comes to how we communicate with others, especially when their personal data is involved. However, with the introduction of the GDPR, we at least have some legal clarity on the best approach.

Browser fingerprinting has been a common tactic of user profiling for some time (albeit in varying degrees of application). It’s arguably the best way of finding out how your business is being accessed. However, if you don’t take the correct measures to look after your users’ data, the tactic could do irreparable damage.

The Ultimate List of Free Stock Photo Resources

The Ultimate List of Free Stock Photo Resources

Photos are some of the most valuable resources for any business or creative ministry. While I’m a huge fan of using pictures that are actually taken in your business or church, I’ve learned that’s not always possible. That’s where stock photos come in. A great stock photo can provide professionalism, beauty, and quality that you may not have access.

A Google search for these valuable resources will generate an infinite number of websites with stock images ranging from a few bucks per photo to thousands of dollars per photo.

What if I told you that you could get absolutely beautiful stock photos for free? You’re not dreaming, my friend. Below are my favorite resources to download some of the best photos on the web for $0/photo. Check out these Free Stock Photo Resources.

1. Unsplash

 

2. Death To The Stock Photo

3. Lightstock’s Free Photo of the Week

4. StockSnap.io

 

5. Gratisography

6. Freely Photos

7. Life of Pix

8. No More Clip Art

9. Snapwire Snaps

10. Picjumbo

11. Jay Mantri

12. New Old Stock

 

Do you have any other resources for free stock photos?

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